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Texting isn’t the only form of distracted driving

| Jan 21, 2021 | Car Accidents |

Statistically, an average of eight people are killed in car accidents in the United States every day. All of these deaths could be prevented through well-maintained roads and safer driving. One of the most common causes of car accidents is distracted driving, and it is completely preventable if drivers are committed to safe driving.

If you or a loved one has been injured in a car accident and you believe that the other driver was at fault, you will need to show why they were at fault. You may be able to cite some form of distracted driving as the cause. The following is an overview of the different types of distracted driving that you may not be aware of.

Visual distraction

To drive safely, a driver needs to be able to see the road ahead and any hazards that present themselves. Therefore, any form of visual distraction is a form of distracted driving. This could be looking down to switch the radio station, texting on a phone or looking behind at the passengers in the back seat. A driver needs to keep their eyes on the road at all times, and if they cause a crash because they are not, they could be liable.

Manual distraction

Drivers should always have both hands available to operate the vehicle. This means that they should not be eating, drinking or holding a phone, and they should have their hands firmly on the wheel. Failing to do so means that they may not be able to react quickly enough if an unforeseen circumstance occurs.

Cognitive distraction

Driving requires focus and concentration. Therefore, if a person is talking or joking around when they are driving, they will not be driving as safely as possible. Similarly, a tired, angry or upset driver is an unsafe driver.

If you believe that a driver caused an accident because they were distracted, it is important that you are able to show the type of distraction that they were affected by when trying to gain back damages.

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